Everything in Moderation

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According to the British Dietetic Association,
the average person will consume 6,000 kcals on Christmas day.

If the ‘average’ person consumes 6,000 kcals, that implies a lot more people must be eating significantly more calories to counterbalance all those people eating a lot less. Wow. I know I like my chocolate but I don’t think even I could eat 6,000 kcals in one day!

Research says that “over the festive period, which seems to kick off earlier and earlier every year, the average person could consume an extra 500 kcals per day, equating to a weight gain of around 5lb by the time we reach the beginning of the New Year.”

I’ve spent the last few months exercising more and getting fit. It would be a shame if I undid all of my success to date for a few weeks over indulgence.

This made me think, “How could I make sure I don’t gain weight or inches and maybe even lose some weight or inches between now and the New Year.”

  • How would you feel in January if you have gone backwards?
  • How are you going to feel if you have undone all your good work so far?
  • Now imagine how good you will feel if you were slimmer and healthier in the New Year.

The main difference between me and a slimmer person is the way they think.

When I’m being good, I stick to my healthy eating and exercise daily. And then something happens – I get stressed or tired and eat chocolate, or maybe just enjoy my food and drink too much on a night out. Then my thinking gets all screwed, “That’s it, I’ve blown it, all that hard work out of the window, I might as well carry on eating. Pass me the chocolate!”

This is the key difference between a ‘slim thinking’ person and an ‘overweight thinking’ person. The ‘overweight thinking’ person thinks “I’ve had too much wine / cake / chocolate / dessert / food, I might as well keep drinking or eating”. Whereas a “slim thinking” person enjoys their night out or that special dessert and the next day returns to their usual healthy eating.

I’ve decided I’m going to think more like a ‘slim thinking’ person over the festive season.

The great thing about the festive season is that most people have time off work. You are free to slow down and really appreciate the company around you.

Slowing down when you eat and eating with consciousness helps you eat less and be satisfied with eating less. Did you know, the average adult human stomach can hold only about two heaped handfuls of food (about the size of a small cantaloupe)? Eating slowly and consciously helps you become aware of that heavy fullness in the stomach that indicates the point of satiety. Once you slow down and tune into your stomach you can enjoy the feeling of lightness and not being stuffed like a Christmas turkey!

I know there are going to be certain meals when I will be eating and drinking a lot more than usual; there will also be meals in between where I can enjoy eating less. I can enjoy that lightness and give my digestive system a break too.

I find it helps to have a target to focus on. One of the best targets is to chose an item of clothing that you want to fit in to in the near future. For me it’s a pair trousers that are too tight to do up.

I also find it helps if you use a smaller plate and drink with a small glass. Have you noticed how big wine glasses are now days? I prefer to use my wine tasting glass; it’s the prefect size. Think about the little changes you can make, they all add up.

My plan is simple enjoy everything in moderation:

  • Think like a ‘slim thinking’ person.
  • Plan healthy meals around events that I know are happening.
  • Allow myself to have what I want to eat and drink at planned events and commit to healthy eating in between.
  • Eat more slowly and enjoy the company of my family and friends.
  • Give my digestive system a break by enjoying the spaces between my planned events and eating less at other meal times.
  • Do something active everyday.

On 4th January I will try my trousers on again and see if I can get into them!

Have a great Christmas and fabulous New Year.

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